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Scientific Papers for Climate

Climate
Climate Alarm
Presentation on Climate v. Climate Alarm

28-Aug-11
Richard S. Lindzen, Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Abstract: The public perception of the climate problem is somewhat schizophrenic. On the one hand, the problem is perceived to be so complex that it cannot be approached without massive computer programs. On the other hand, the physics is claimed to be so basic that the dire conclusions commonly presented are considered to be self-evident.

Consistent with this situation, climate has become a field where there is a distinct separation of theory and modeling. Commonly, in fluid mechanics, theory provides useful constraints and tests when applied to modeling results. This has been notably absent in current work on climate.


Climate Change
How To Think About Climate Change

20-Mar-21
William Happer, An Online Discussion of the Schiller Institute.
Abstract: Link to YouTube Video

A Constraint Equation for Climate

29-Oct-21
Howard "Cork" Hayden
Abstract: The IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) is some 3949 pages long and is dedicated mostly to many complex details in the estimates of our future CO2 emissions, the behavior of the atmosphere, estimations of temperatures in places without thermometers, melting permafrost, atmospheric H2O content, ice melt, sea rise, feedback mechanisms, and so forth. The climate system is certainly complex and chaotic, but it is still subject to constraints. We will derive an important—but simple—equation of constraint. The equation will be of no use in predicting the worldwide average temperature in (say) 2060, nor will it be of use in describing the climate in any locale. Its usefulness lies in the fact that at equilibrium it must be balanced.

CO2, IR, and Climate
Comments on CO2, IR, and Climate

28-Mar-21
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Professor of Physics, Emeritus
Abstract: It is hard to believe, when thinking of things as large as the earth, that people get bogged down in minutiae, staring at things through microscopes and not seeing the globe. This essay is about the big picture, and everything herein is based on well-known facts.

CO2 vs. Albedo

19-Aug-23
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: In IPCC jargon, radiative forcing refers to changes in the radiative flux of the earth, compared to the “pre-industrial” period of 1850-1900. In the more rational jargon of van Wijngaarden and Happer, the term refers to the totality of the radiative flux.

NIPCC
Nature, Not Human Activity, Rules the Climate

01-Apr-08
S. Fred Singer, SEPP
Abstract: Published by THE HEARTLAND INSTITUTE
Our concern about the environment, going back some 40 years, has taught us important lessons. It is one thing to impose drastic measures and harsh economic penalties when an environmental problem is clear-cut and severe. It is foolish to do so when the problem is largely hypothetical and not substantiated by observations. As NIPCC shows by offering an independent, non-governmental second opinion on the global warming issue, we do not currently have any convincing evidence or observations of significant climate change from other than natural causes.


Omissions
Where Were the "Climate Scientists?"

01-Apr-24
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: Look up the climate for a certain place you’d like to visit, and you’ll find long-term averages of temperature, rainfall, snowfall, humidity, and the like. Properly, “long-term” implies at least 30 years.

When climatologists talk about “the climate,” they refer to such data averaged all over the planet. Phenomena such as a hot spell in New England, a whole season of hotter weather than average in the Great Plains, or “atmospheric rivers” causing unusual flooding in California are local weather events, not changes in local climate, and certainly not changes in planetary climate.


Physics
Basic Climate Physics #1

13-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the first in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate.
What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #2

13-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the second in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #3

20-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time This short essay is the third in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate. Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.

Basic Climate Physics #4

20-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the fourth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate. Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #5

20-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the fifth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate. Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #6

27-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the sixth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.
We begin with a section from Basic Climate Physics #5


Basic Climate Physics #7

27-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the seventh in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #8

27-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the eighth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #9

27-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the ninth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics #10

27-Mar-22
Howard “Cork” Hayden, Prof. Emeritus of Physics, UConn, corkhayden@comcast.net
Abstract: One fact at a time
This short essay is the tenth in a short series about basic (meaning all-inclusive) physics that pertains to the subject of climate.
Bear in mind that my purpose is not to engage in details about wind, rain, snow, storms, historical climatology, Milankovitch cycles, or any of the common topics discussed about climate. What I will discuss is some simple physics.


Basic Climate Physics - Extended UN Deficiency

01-Oct-22
Howard Hayden
Abstract: CO2 Emissions - For some wavelengths, infrared travels less than a meter before being absorbed by CO2 at our present concentration of about 400 molecules per million molecules of air (ppmv). For a lot more wavelengths, the IR is stopped before going 10 meters. Accordingly, even with only 1 percent as much CO2 as we have, CO2 would be a strong greenhouse absorber. However, we are concerned with what happens as the atmospheric CO2 concentration increases from 400 ppmv [parts per million in volume] to 800 ppmv, as may happen during the next century.

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Biography
 Cork Hayden [1]

Climate
 Climate Alarm [1]
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 CO2, IR, and Climate [2]
 NIPCC [1]
 Omissions [1]
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Climate Models
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Himalayan Glaciers
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IPCC
 Definition [3]
 Models [3]
 Santer-Stocker [1]

NIPCC Report
 Sea Level Rise [1]

Nuclear
 Radioactive Waste [1]

Temperature Trends
 2 degree C [1]
 Modeled v. Observed [1]
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